60-Second Civics

Saturday, April 13
   Daily civics quiz

Voting rights in colonial America depended on

 
 
 
 

Listen to today's podcast:


[Download]   rss feed  Twitter


Donate


  

 



About the Podcast: 60-Second Civics is a daily podcast that provides a quick and convenient way for listeners to learn about our nation’s government, the Constitution, and our history. The podcast explores themes related to civics and government, the constitutional issues behind the headlines, and the people and ideas that formed our nation’s history and government.

60-Second Civics is produced by the Center for Civic Education. The show's content is primarily derived from the Center’s education for democracy curricula, including We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution, Foundations of Democracy, and Elements of Democracy.

Subscribe: It's easy to subscribe! Listen on YouTubeiTunes or Stitcher or subscribe via RSS.

Get Involved: Join the conversation about each episode on Twitter. Or you can contact the show by emailing Mark Gage. Let me know what you think!

You Can Help: 60-Second Civics is supported by private donations. You can help keep the podcasts coming by donating, buying an ebook, or by writing a nice review in iTunes to help others discover the show. We love our listeners. You are the reason we created the podcast. Thank you for your kind support!

Music:
The theme music for 60-Second Civics is provided by Cheryl B. Engelhardt. You can find her online at cbemusic.com. The song featured on the podcast is Cheryl B. Engelhardt's "Complacent," which you purchase on iTunes, along with all of Cheryl's music.


Looking for a particular episode? Search by keyword here:



60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5099, Susan B. Anthony: Women's History Month, Part 18
After her trial for having voted in an 1872 election, Susan B. Anthony explained to the judge the implications of her conviction: "My natural rights, my civil rights, my political rights, are all alike ignored. Robbed of the fundamental privilege of citizenship, I am degraded from the status of a citizen to that of a subject." Today, women in Rochester, New York, cover her grave with "I Voted" stickers.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5097, The Seneca Falls Convention: Women's History Month, Part 16
In 1848, about 300 activists met in Seneca Falls, New York, for the first convention in the United States devoted to women's rights. They discussed Elizabeth Cady Stanton's proposed Declaration of Sentiments, which mirrored the language of the Declaration of Independence.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5096, The Forten Sisters: Women's History Month, Part 15
Margaretta, Harriet, and Sarah Forten were three powerful African American campaigners for the abolition and women's rights movements. Harriet and Sarah married members of another prominent abolitionist family, the Purvises. Harriet and her husband Robert were involved in the Underground Railroad, and their home served as a refuge for people who had escaped slavery and as a meeting place for abolitionists.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5092, Fanny Wright: Women's History Month, Part 11
Fanny Wright was radical by the standards of her time. She was a writer and social activist who campaigned for equal rights for women, free and secular public education for both boys and girls, and the abolition of slavery, among other social and political issues. Wright was a fierce advocate of equality. She was friends with Thomas Jefferson and the Marquis de Lafayette, conversing with them about political philosophy, and she admired the American experiment with self-government.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5091, Mercy Otis Warren: Women's History Month, Part 10
Mercy Otis Warren was a playwright, poet, historian, and Anti-Federalist political commentator during the American Revolution. She was a talented writer, admired for her skill and her dedication to the principles of natural rights behind the Revolution.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5090, Margaret Todd Whetten: Women's History Month, Part 9
Margaret Todd Whetten and her daughters provided food, clothing, and support to American prisoners in New York City, despite being called by one British jailer the "damndest rebels in New York." They provided a safe refuge for American spies in their home, saving them from capture and certain hanging. As as result, her house became known as the "rebel headquarters."

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5089, Women During the Revolutionary War: Women's History Month, Part 8
Women served the American cause in many ways during the Revolutionary War, even as combatants.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5088, The Daughters of Liberty: Women's History Month, Part 7
At the start of the American Revolution, women patriots organized into a group known as the Daughters of Liberty. Like their male counterparts, the Sons of Liberty, women took action, such as boycotts, to protest British policies. For example, they replace imported British tea with "liberty tea," made from leaves, herbs, fruits, and flowers, like goldenrod. Without women's adherence to the boycotts, they would not have been effective.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5086, Nanye'hi: Women's History Month, Part 5
Despite being known as the "War Woman of Chota," Nanye'hi, also known as Nancy Ward, was a Cherokee woman who would work for much of her life to ensure peace between the Cherokees and the Americans, while attempting to prevent the further seizure of Cherokee land.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5085, Elizabeth Freeman: Women's History Month, Part 4
Elizabeth Freeman, also known as Mum Bett, escaped slavery in a way that was unusual: she took her case to court. She approached lawyer Theodore Sedgwick with this question: "I heard that paper read yesterday that says 'all men are born equal,' and that every man has a right to freedom ... won't the law give me my freedom?" Appealing to her natural rights and her rights under the Massachusetts Constitution of 1780, she sued for her freedom and won.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5084, Ona Judge: Women's History Month, Part 3
Ona Judge escaped George and Martha Washington's household, where she was an enslaved housemaid, and made her way to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, where she eluded George Washington's determined attempts to capture her. She made a new life for herself in New Hampshire, marrying and having three children. Her side of her remarkable story survives because she gave interviews to at least two abolitionist newspapers.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5083, Coverture and the Colonial Era: Women's History Month, Part 2
A married woman living during the American colonial era would have lived under the legal doctrine called "coverture," where her legal identity was subsumed under that of her husband. William Blackstone wrote, "By marriage, the husband and wife are one person in the law: that is, the very being or legal existence of the woman is suspended during the marriage, or at least is incorporated and consolidated into that of the husband: under whose wing, protection, and cover, she performs every thing." This was governed by colonial law before independence and state law after independence. It would not change substantially after the Revolution in most states, but divorce and child custody laws would change.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5082, The Struggle for Equality: Women's History Month, Part 1
It's Women's History Month! All this month, 60-Second Civics will explain the struggle for equal rights for women and how our Constitution and laws evolved to make our nation a more representative democracy. In this episode, we briefly trace the struggle of women for equal voting rights in the United States.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5081, Important Figures in the Civil Rights Movement: Dr. Vicki Ross-Norris, Part 6
Throughout her life, Dr. Ross-Norris has interacted with several prominent civil rights leaders, including Dr. Dorothy Height and Rev. Fauntroy. Learn more how these figures inspired the next generation of civil rights leaders in today's episode.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5080, Maya Angelou and Her Role as a Citizen: Dr. Vicki Ross-Norris, Part 5
Maya Angelou, an African American poet and civil rights activist, used her artistic abilities to communicate the Black experience and serve as an instrument for others to understand African American culture. Listen as Dr. Vicki Ross-Norris recounts her interactions with Maya Angelou in today's episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5079, Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Dr. Vicki Ross-Norris, Part 4
Today, we ask our guest, Dr. Vicki Ross-Norris, why historically black colleges and universities are important. In the episode, she shares her experience as a Howard University alumna and how attending an HBCU was significant to her as an African American.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5078, The Tuskegee Airmen: Dr. Vicki Ross-Norris, Part 3
In today's episode, Dr. Ross-Norris talks about the Tuskegee Airmen, a group her father belonged to and who taught her important lessons about civics and being an American.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5077, Learning About the African American Experience: Dr. Vicki Ross-Norris, Part 2
In February, we celebrate Black History Month. Today we ask Dr. Ross-Norris: Why should all Americans learn about the African American experience? Listen to learn why!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5075, A Just and a Lasting Peace
By the time of Abraham Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address, the Civil War was winding down. Learn more about his hopes for a just and a lasting peace after the war on today's 60-Second Civics podcast.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5074, Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address
Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, given on November 19, 1863, recognized the central importance of founding-era principles to the meaning and destiny of America. Learn more about this famous address in today???s episode of 60-Second Civics.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5073, Abraham Lincoln and America's Founding Principles
Abraham Lincoln tried to revive and renew political principles that defined America at its birth in 1776 throughout his political career. Listen to learn more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5071, The Emancipation Proclamation
On September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln publicly announced his Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. It warned the Confederate rebels that unless they rejoined the Union, a final proclamation would free all slaves within the seceded states. Listen to learn more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5070, Abraham Lincoln on Slavery
After winning the 1860 presidential election, Lincoln repeated his long-held opposition to slavery. However, he insisted that the federal government would not take action against slavery in the states where it existed.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5069, Lincoln Takes Strong Action against the Rebellion
Learn about President Lincoln and the writ of habeas corpus.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5068, Suspending the Writ of Habeas Corpus During the Civil War
Chief Justice Roger B. Taney rules against Abraham Lincoln's aggressive use of war powers.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5067, The Prize Cases
The Prize Cases posed a constitutional test of Abraham Lincoln's use of war powers during an emergency.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5066, Congress Approves Lincoln's Actions
Critics accused Abraham Lincoln of trampling on the Constitution, but he thought his actions were needed to save both the Union and the Constitution.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5065, Lincoln Takes Immediate Action Against the Confederacy
When fighting began between Confederate and Union forces in April of 1861, Abraham Lincoln acted decisively, but some questioned whether his actions were constitutional. Learn more about Lincoln???s reaction to secession and the constitutional debate in this episode of the 60-Second Civics daily podcast.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5064, The Civil War Begins
Abraham Lincoln faced a tough first year in office: secession and war plagued the nation.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5063, Abraham Lincoln Elected President
Lincoln lost his campaign for the Senate, but won the presidency two years later.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5061, Abraham Lincoln Begins His Political Career
Abraham Lincoln was largely self-taught, having less than one year of formal education. Yet, he became a lawyer and was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. Learn more about the beginning of Abraham Lincoln's career in today???s episode of 60-Second Civics.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5060, Abraham Lincoln's Early Life
Today, we begin a brief series on Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth president of the United States. We start by mapping his early years, which began in Kentucky on February 12, 1809.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5059, The 27th Amendment
The 27th Amendment was originally introduced with the Bill of Rights, but it was not ratified until 1992. It says that legislation modifying the salary of members of Congress will take effect until after an election of representatives. This gives the American people the chance to vote out of office legislators they think may have excessively raised their salaries.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5058, The 26th Amendment
The 26th Amendment recognized the right of citizens 18 year of age and older to vote. The Vietnam War was a strong contributing factor to the adoption of the amendment, which was ratified in only 107 days, the fastest ratification in American history. Thousands of young people served in the Vietnam War, including many who would die in the conflict.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5057, The 25th Amendment
The 25th Amendment describes the procedure for when a president or vice president dies or is unable to fulfill their duties. It seems like a mundane part of the Constitution, but it has been used many times since its ratification in 1967

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5056, The 24th Amendment
The 24th Amendment outlawed poll taxes as a requirement for voting. After more than 100 years of discriminatory voting practices, the right of African Americans to vote in all elections was finally protected by this amendment, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and a 1966 Supreme Court decision.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5055, The 23rd Amendment
The 23rd Amendment established the right of residents of the District of Columbia to vote for president and vice president. It limits the district to the same number of Electoral College votes that it would have if it were a state, but not more than the least populous state. The District therefore has three Electoral College votes.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5054, The 22nd Amendment
The 22nd Amendment limits presidents to just two full terms in office. It was added to the Constitution in reaction to President Franklin D. Roosevelt's unprecedented four terms in office.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5053, The 21st Amendment
After more than a decade of Prohibition, Americans were tired of it. So, Congress proposed the 21st Amendment, which outlawed the 18th Amendment and ended nationwide prohibition. The states, municipalities, and counties could still enact their own prohibition laws, however, and many of them did.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5052, The 20h Amendment
The 20th Amendment shortened the period between when the president, vice president, and members of Congress are elected and when they take office. It also specified what would happen if a president-elect were to die between the election and the inauguration.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5051, The 19th Amendment
The 19th Amendment recognized the right of women to vote. The amendment was the result of years of activism by campaigners for suffrage for women. However, until the Voting Rights Act of 1965, African American women faced serious obstacles to voting.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5050, The 18th Amendment
The ratification of the 18th Amendment in 1919 began the era of Prohibition. The amendment banned the andquot;manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors.andquot; This opened up new opportunities for organized crime, which grew substantially during the period.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5049, The 17th Amendment
The 17th Amendment to the Constitution mandates the direct popular election of U.S. senators. Before the amendment was ratified in 1913, senators were chosen by state legislatures.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5048, The 16th Amendment
The 16th Amendment to the Constitution established the national government's authority to establish a federal income tax without having to divide the revenues among the states based on their population. The amendment resulted in a change in the way the national government was funded.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5047, The 15th Amendment
The 15th Amendment to the Constitution, ratified in 1870, sought to ensure the right of African American men to vote. However, grandfather clauses, literacy tests, poll taxes, as well as violence and intimidation, were serious barriers preventing African American men from realizing this right.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5046, The 14th Amendment
The 14th Amendment made a deep and lasting impact on the United States, helping to form a more perfect union. First it recognized the citizenship of African Americans. It also forbade states to deny due process and equal protection of the laws. It did a great many other things, as well.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5045, The 13th Amendment
The 13th Amendment abolished slavery in the United States, but controversy remains over the loophole in the amendment that says that prisoners can be forced to work.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5044, The 12th Amendment
The 12th Amendment requires electors in the Electoral College to make separate choices for president and vice president. Before this amendment, electors voted for two people for president. The winner would become president and the second-place finisher vice president. The election of 1800 convinced Americans that this system needed to change.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5043, The 11th Amendment
The 11th Amendment protects states against being sued by citizens of other states or foreign nations. It supports the idea of sovereign immunity for states, meaning that they are immune to lawsuits that they do not consent to.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5042, Bill of Rights, Part 10: The 10th Amendment
The 10th Amendment addressed the fears of some Framers of the Constitution that creating a Bill of Rights might lead people to believe that the national government has more powers than those specifically enumerated in the Constitution. It states that those powers not specifically delegated to the national government are reserved to the states or the people.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5041, Bill of Rights, Part 9: Ninth Amendment
The first eight amendments to the U.S. Constitution contain specific guarantees of rights. But the Ninth Amendment simply says that the rights contained in the Constitution do not limit or reduce any other rights the people have. We'll learn about competing theories about what exactly the Ninth Amendment means in today's 60-Second Civics podcast.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5040, Bill of Rights, Part 8: Eighth Amendment
The Eighth Amendment to the Constitution prohibits excessive bail and fines. It also prohibits cruel and unusual punishment, which the Supreme Court has interpreted since in various ways over the years.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5039, Bill of Rights, Part 7: The Seventh Amendment
The Seventh Amendment to the Constitution guarantees the right to a jury trial in most federal civil cases. It does not apply to the states, but most state protect this right in their constitutions.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5038, Bill of Rights, Part 6: The Sixth Amendment
The Sixth Amendment to the Constitution protects several rights to help ensure a fair trial, including the right to a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5037, Bill of Rights, Part 5: The Fifth Amendment
The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution is designed to limit the federal government's power to prosecute people for crimes and to protect the rights of the accused. In this episode of the 60-Second Civics podcast, we explore each of the rights protected under the Fifth Amendment.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5036, Bill of Rights, Part 4: The Fourth Amendment
The Fourth Amendment to the Constitution provides a constitutional guarantee against unreasonable searches and seizures by the government. In this episode of 60-Second Civics, we explain what this means and provide some examples.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5035, Bill of Rights, Part 3: The Third Amendment
The Third Amendment to the Constitution prohibits the quartering of soldiers in private homes. This might sound strange to us now, but it was a reality for American colonists in the pre-Revolutionary era, who were deprived of this right by the British authorities even though it was a right allowed to their British brethren.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5034, Bill of Rights, Part 2: The Second Amendment
The Second Amendment deals with both the power of states to organize and maintain a militia, now known as the National Guard, and the right of Americans to keep and bear arms. Learn more on today's 60-Second Civics podcast.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5033, Bill of Rights, Part 1: The First Amendment
What rights are part of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution? Find out on today's podcast. Today's episode is the first in a 10-part series on the Bill of Rights.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5032, Issues Facing Native American Communities Today: Native American Heritage Month, Part 15 (rebroadcast)
In the final episode of our Native American Heritage Month Series, Terry Mason Moore, enrolled member of the Osage tribe, discusses current and future issues facing Native American communities and all Americans today. Listen for more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5031, Tribal Sovereignty and Native American Citizenship: Native American Heritage Month, Part 14 (rebroadcast)
Native Americans are citizens of three governments: Their tribe, their state, and the United States. Learn more about the history and dynamics of Native American citizenship from the Center for Civic Education???s board member, Terry Mason Moore.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5030, Being an Enrolled Member of the Osage Nation: Native American Heritage Month, Part 12 (rebroadcast)
In this episode, Terry Mason Moore discusses her life growing up as an enrolled member of the Osage Nation in Oklahoma. Listen to learn more about her family, experiences, and culture have shaped her life!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5029, How Native American Cultures Enrich the United States: Native American Heritage Month, Part 13 (rebroadcast)
According to Terry Mason Moore, enrolled member of the Osage Nation, Native cultures are vibrant and living cultures with a long history of interaction and engagement with the non-native people of the United States. Learn more about how these cultures enrich all peoples in our nation!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5028, What Is Native American Heritage Month? Native American Heritage Month, Part 11 (rebroadcast)
In continuing our Native American Heritage Month series, we are joined by a very special guest, Terry Mason Moore, an enrolled member of the Osage Nation, an attorney, and a member of the Center of Civic Education Board of Directors. In this episode, she discusses what National Native American Heritage Month entails and its importance.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5027, Native American Activism: Native American Heritage Month, Part 10 (rebroadcast)
In 1968 several hundred members of Native American tribes met to discuss issues affecting their communities. The American Indian Movement, or AIM, emerged out of this meeting, which has set the stage for more modern activism among Native Americans today. Listen for more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5026, Tribal Recognition: Native American Heritage Month, Part 9 (rebroadcast)
Several hundred Native American tribes in the United States are currently seeking official tribal recognition from the federal government, a process that often takes decades to complete. Federal recognition is important for tribes because it formally establishes a government-to-government relationship. Learn more in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5025, Vacillating Policy Toward Native American Tribes: Native American Heritage Month, Part 8 (rebroadcast)
The national government policy vacillated between respecting the sovereignty of Native American tribes and seeking to dismantle tribal governments and to integrate their members into the United States. Listen for more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5024, Removing Obstacles to Native American Voting: Native American Heritage Month, Part 7 (rebroadcast)
The Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 extended the right to vote to all Native Americans, but many encountered obstacles to voting, serving on juries, and giving testimony in courts. Learn more about how these obstacles were removed in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5023, Indian Citizenship Act of 1924: Native American Heritage Month, Part 6 (rebroadcast)
While Native Americans were originally not granted American citizenship, the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 recognized the right to vote of all “Indians born within the territorial limits of the United States.” Learn more about how this change came about in this episode of the 60-Second Civics podcast.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5022, Denial of Native American Citizenship and Voting Rights: Native American Heritage Month, Part 5 (rebroadcast)
The Framers of the Constitution considered Native Americans to be members of their tribes, which they considered foreign nations. Thus, they denied them citizenship and the right to vote. Learn more about how this set a foundation for future relations in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5021, Native American Activist Marie Louise Bottineau Baldwin: Native American Heritage Month, Part 4 (rebroadcast)
Marie Louise Bottineau Baldwin was a Native American activist, attorney, and advocate of women's right to vote. Learn more about her life and work in our latest Native American Heritage Month episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5020, The Power of Native American Women in the Colonial Era: Native American Heritage Month, Part 3 (rebroadcast)
Europeans were surprised that Native American women had so much power and influence, particularly within the Haudenosaunee nations. In those nations, women held political power within the tribes, appointing and removing chiefs at their discretion.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5019, Native Americans During the Colonial Era: Native American Heritage Month, Part 2 (rebroadcast)
While Native Americans had lived on the North American continent for at least 24,000 years, the arrival of colonists brought great conflict and change. Learn more about Native Americans in the colonial era in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5018, Native American Tribes in Early America: Native American Heritage Month, Part 1 (rebroadcast)
In honor of Native American Heritage Month, we are rebroadcasting some 60-Second Civics episodes highlighting Native American history, culture, and experience, starting with Native American tribes in the early U.S. Hundreds of different groups of Native Americans had inhabited the continent for thousands of years, including the Eastern Woodland tribes. Learn more about the some of these tribes in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5017, Out of Many, One: The Elements of Democracy, Part 17
The people who agree together to form a democratic state may be, and often are, of varying ethnic, religious, national or racial backgrounds. They unite under a common civic identity, but retain their unique ethnic identities as well. Listen to today's 60-Second Civics podcast to learn more.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5016, Minority Consent: The Elements of Democracy, Part 16 (rebroadcast)
We all know that in a democracy, the people are the rulers. But does this mean all the people? What about majority rule and the rights of minority groups? Listen to learn more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5015, Who Are the People in a Democracy? The Elements of Democracy, Part 15 (rebroadcast)
Democracy means andquot;rule by the people,andquot; but who are andquot;the peopleandquot; in a democracy? Find out in today's episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5014, Limited Powers of Democratic Governments: The Elements of Democracy, Part 14 (rebroadcast)
It is an abuse of power for a democratic government to claim more powers than the people have delegated to it.??Therefore, limited government is an important aspect of democracy. Listen to learn more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5013, Alienation and Consent: The Elements of Democracy, Part 13 (rebroadcast)
Many citizens in modern democracies fail to vote or participate in other ways that express their consent to be governed. This sign of alienation of individuals and groups from the political system represents a widespread problem in modern democracies. Listen for more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5011, Authority Flows from the People: The Elements of Democracy, Part 11 (rebroadcast)
In a democracy, political authority flows from the people to the state--not from the state to the people. Why is this the case? Learn more in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5012, The People Delegate Authority: The Elements of Democracy, Part 12 (rebroadcast)
In a democracy, the people delegate their authority to government, but only as much is necessary to fulfill the purposes for which states are established. Listen for more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5010, Popular Sovereignty: The Elements of Democracy, Part 10 (rebroadcast)
Popular sovereignty is a basic idea of democracy and means that the people are the ultimate source of the authority of their government. Listen for more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5009, Fundamental Rights: The Elements of Democracy, Part 9 (rebroadcast)
Liberal democracy recognizes the importance of the individual and that all persons have certain fundamental rights. Learn what these rights look like in today's episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5008, The Rule of Law: The Elements of Democracy, Part 8 (rebroadcast)
The rule of law is a primary element of constitutionalism. An essential means of limiting government is establishing a rule of law, beginning with the constitution itself, which is a fundamental law. Listen to learn more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5007, Constitutionalism: The Elements of Democracy, Part 7 (rebroadcast)
Constitutionalism is the use of constitutions to limit government by law. Learn more about constitutions in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5006, Free and Fair Elections: The Elements of Democracy, Part 6 (rebroadcast)
What three characteristics must elections in a democracy possess? Find out on today's podcast.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5005, Rule by the People: The Elements of Democracy, Part 5 (rebroadcast)
Democracy can be defined as rule by the people through free and fair elections. Learn more about the central role of the governed in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5004, Democracy Defined: The Elements of Democracy, Part 4 (rebroadcast)
Democracy originated more than 2,400 years ago in ancient Greece. The word democracy means rule by the people. Learn more about what this means in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5003, Political Authority: The Elements of Democracy, Part 3 (rebroadcast)
Political authority is the right to make and enforce binding rules known as laws. While political power is the ability to persuade others to follow the policies of those who hold power, authority adds legitimacy to the exercise of this power. Learn more in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5002, Authority: The Elements of Democracy, Part 2 (rebroadcast)
What is authority? What is the difference between authority and power? Learn about this difference in today's episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5001, Politics: The Elements of Democracy, Part 1 (rebroadcast)
Today on the podcast we begin a series that explores the basic elements of democracy. We begin with a look at politics which is found wherever people live together. Listen for more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 5000, Security: Digital Citizenship, Part 8 (rebroadcast)
The online world is unfortunately full of people who would love to compromise your device and use it for their own purposes. So what can you do to stay secure online? Learn some simple tips today!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4999, Privacy: Digital Citizenship, Part 7 (rebroadcast)
When you use digital technology, much of your personal information is collected by the companies that run them. You have a right to privacy, but you should also take steps to protect yourself. Listen for more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4998, Staying Safe: Digital Citizenship, Part 6 (rebroadcast)
The internet and social media can be great places to spend your time, but they also present certain dangers, especially for young people. It???s up to you to be aware of your own personal safety online, but there are a few commonsense recommendations that can help. Listen for these tips!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4997, Responsibility: Digital Citizenship, Part 5 (rebroadcast)
An important part of digital citizenship is taking responsibility for your actions on digital platforms.??Part of this is knowing when to engage and when to pull back. Today we share some simple tips for acting with responsibility online!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4996, Full Participation and Equal Access to Technology: Digital Citizenship, Part 4 (rebroadcast)
What does it mean to participate fully in digital civic life? One factor to consider is whether all Americans have equal access to digital technology. But what barriers exist? Listen to learn more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4995, All About the Benjamins: Digital Citizenship: Part 3 (rebroadcast)
Smartphones and other digital devices make it easy to buy things quickly, but it???s important to protect yourself when shopping online. Learn strategies for shopping smart online in today's episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4993, What Is Digital Citizenship? Digital Citizenship, Part 1 (rebroadcast)
Young people today face a few unique challenges interacting with digital media. Our new series unpacks how to safely navigate these challenges while ensuring all rights are respected and that everyone is acting with responsibility.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4992, Federalism and Limited Government: Democratic Norms, Part 5 (rebroadcast)
Federalism and limited government are principles that ensure that the American political system protects liberty and natural rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness as outlined in the Declaration of Independence. Listen to learn more from Dr. Bose in this final episode of the series!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4991, Separation of Powers: Checks and Balances: Democratic Norms, Part 4 (rebroadcast)
To ensure that no individual or institution would have too much power in the American republic, the Framers of the Constitution designed a system of separation of powers and checks and balances. Learn more about these important features of American government in today's 60-Second Civics podcast.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4990, The Rule of Law: Democratic Norms, Part 3 (rebroadcast)
What makes a democracy function is the premise that no one is above the rule of law. But what does that mean? Learn more from Dr. Bose in today's episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4988, Representative Government: Democratic Norms, Part 1 (rebroadcast)
How is representative government a democratic norm? Today we start the first of our five-day series on democratic norms with Dr. Meena Bose, the Peter S. Kalikow Chair in Presidential Studies and Executive Dean for Public Policy and Public Service Programs at Hofstra University. In our first episode, Dr. Bose discusses representative government, which is a fundamental feature of American democracy. Listen to learn more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4987, Beyond the Legacy: Citizenship
How has citizenship in the United States evolved and what is its future? Professor Henry L. Chambers Jr. of the University of Richmond School of Law explains how notions of American citizenship have changed from the founding period today and offers some ideas about how American citizenship might change in the future.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4986, Birthright Citizenship: Citizenship, Part 5
What is birthright citizenship, and how might American citizenship change in the future? Professor Henry L. Chambers Jr. of the University of Richmond School of Law explains the concept of birthright citizenship and discusses ways that the concept of citizenship might change over time.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4985, Rights of Citizenship: Citizenship, Part 4
What types of rights are associated with citizenship? Professor Henry L. Chambers Jr. of the University of Richmond School of Law explains some useful ways to think about citizenship, including how the rights of citizens have changed over the years.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4984, The 14th Amendment Transforms Citizenship: Citizenship, Part 3
How did the 14th Amendment transform citizenship in America? Professor Henry L. Chambers Jr. of the University of Richmond School of Law explains the impact of the 14th Amendment on citizenship and its particular effect on formerly enslaved Americans who were born in the United States.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4983, Citizenship Before the Civil War: Citizenship, Part 2
What was citizenship in America before the Civil War? Professor Henry L. Chambers Jr. of the University of Richmond School of Law explains the uncertain status of citizenship before the Civil War, particularly for Black Americans.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4979, The Reconstruction Amendments: Civil Rights, Part 3 (rebroadcast)
How did the Reconstruction Amendments set the stage for the ongoing battle for civil rights? In this episode of 60-Second Civics, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4980, Brown v. Board of Education: Civil Rights, Part 4 (rebroadcast)
How was segregation in public schools found to be unconstitutional? In this episode of 60-Second Civics, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains the landmark case of Brown v. Board of Education, which determined that separate schools for Black and White children was inherently unequal.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4978, Frederick Douglass's Speech: Civil Rights, Part 2 (rebroadcast)
How does Frederick Douglass's speech, "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?," capture the struggle for civil rights before the Civil War? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains the 1852 speech by abolitionist Frederick Douglass, who himself had one been enslaved.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4977, Civil Rights at the Founding: Civil Rights, Part 1 (rebroadcast)
What were civil rights at our country's founding? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains the status of civil rights during America's founding period and how some Blacks responded to the Declaration of Independence and the outbreak of the Revolutionary War.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4976, Beyond the Legacy: Women's Rights, Part 6 (rebroadcast)
In this extended episode of 60-Second Civics, Dr. Lisa Tetrault, associate professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, explains in more detail topics of women's rights from the previous five episodes. Dr. Tetrault covers the Seneca Falls Convention, the Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments, the role of Frederick Douglass, and the Equal Rights Amendment, among other topics. This is the sixth episode in our 60-Second Civics series on women's rights as part of the Center for Civic Education's Civil Discourse: An American Legacy Project.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4975, The Equal Rights Amendment: Women's Rights, Part 5 (rebroadcast)
What is the Equal Rights Amendment and how would its ratification change American life? In this episode, Dr. Lisa Tetrault, associate professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, explains the Equal Rights Amendment. This is the fifth episode in our 60-Second Civics series on women's rights as part of the Center for Civic Education's Civil Discourse: An American Legacy Project.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4973, Minor v. Happersett: Women's Rights, Part 3 (rebroadcast)
What was the impact on women and on voting rights of the 1875 case of Minor v. Happersett? Dr. Lisa Tetrault, associate professor of American history at Carnegie Mellon University, explains the 1875 Supreme Court Case of Minor v. Happersett and its importance for the women's suffrage movement. This is the third episode in our 60-Second Civics series on women's rights as part of the Center for Civic Education's Civil Discourse: An American Legacy Project.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4972, The Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments: Women's Rights, Part 2 (rebroadcast)
What was the Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments and how does it relate to the Declaration of Independence? In this episode, Dr. Lisa Tetrault, associate professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, explains the historical significance of the Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4971, The Seneca Falls Convention: Women's Rights, Part 1 (rebroadcast)
This is the first episode in our series on women's rights as part of our Civil Discourse and American Legacy Project. Dr. Lisa Tetrault, associate professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, explains the significance of the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4969, Political Parties During the Civil War Era: The Evolution of Political Parties, Part 4 (rebroadcast)
How did the modern two-party system begin to form? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains the demise of the Whigs and the rise of today's dominant political parties in this episode of 60-Second Civics.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4970, Political Parties in the 1960s: The Evolution of Political Parties, Part 5 (rebroadcast)
How did American political parties evolve in the 1960s? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains how both the Democratic and Republican political parties evolved due to the social changes of the 1960s.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4968, Political Parties in Jacksonian Democracy: The Evolution of Political Parties, Part 3 (rebroadcast)
What caused the rise of electioneering in the United States? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains how the Federalist party split and examines the rise of Jacksonian democracy.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4967, The Origins of Political Parties: The Evolution of Political Parties, Part 2
How did political parties come about in the early American republic? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains how the Federalists and the Democratic Republicans came to be the first two political parties in the United States.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4966, The Functions of Political Parties: The Evolution of Political Parties, Part 1 (rebroadcast)
What are the functions of political parties? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains four functions of political parties in this episode of 60-Second Civics.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4965, Ratifying the Constitution: Principles of the Constitution, Part 5
What was the process of ratifying or rejecting the proposed plan of government after the 1787 convention? In this episode Dr. Lester Brooks, American history professor emeritus from Anne Arundel Community College, explains the process for ratifying the Constitution and the role played by the Federalists and Anti-Federalists.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4964, Forms of Government: Principles of the Constitution, Part 4 (rebroadcast)
In this video, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains how the Framers of the Constitution thought about fundamental principles embodied in the Constitution.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4962, Major Issues of the Philadelphia Convention, Separation of Power: Principles of the Constitution, Part 2 (rebroadcast)
Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains how separation of powers was a major issue at the Philadelphia Convention, which drafted the new Constitution for the United States.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4961, The Need for a New Constitution: Principles of the Constitution, Part 1 (rebroadcast)
Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, describes some of the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and explains why the Framers intended to amend it.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4960, The Diversity of the American Colonies: Back-to-School Basics, Part 6 (rebroadcast)
The American colonists came from a variety of countries and for various economic, religious, and social reasons. Learn more about the diverse group that came to settle in the colonies with today's episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4959, Native Americans and Colonial America: Back-to-School Basics, Part 5 (rebroadcast)
The American colonists were not the first people on the North American continent. Native Americans had lived on the continent for at least 24,000 years. Listen to today's episode to learn a little more about Native Americans during colonial times!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4958, Opportunities in the Early American Colonies: Back-to-School Basics, Part 4 (rebroadcast)
Many new arrivals to the American colonies found it to be a land of opportunity. Americans were a hardworking people and had the highest standard of living in the world.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4957, Portraits of Some American Founders: Back-to-School Basics, Part 3 (rebroadcast)
Who were the American Founders? Learn more about some of the people who laid the groundwork for the American system of representative government.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4956, The American Founders: Back to School Basics, Part 2 (rebroadcast)
The American Founders drew on a number of basic ideas and experiences to create the kind of government they believed would best protect the natural rights of Americans and promote the common good. Get introduced to some of the Founders in today's episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4955, An Adventure in Ideas with We the People: Back to School Basics, Part 1
The history of the American people has been a great adventure in ideas and in trying to make these ideas a reality. Over the next few weeks, 60-Second Civics will explore the important philosophical ideas and historical events that influenced the writing of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4954, Beyond the Legacy: The Evolution of Political Parties, Part 6
How have American political parties evolved since the country's founding period? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, traces the arc of the development of political parties in the United States in this bonus extended episode of 60-Second Civics.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4953, Political Parties in the 1960s: The Evolution of Political Parties, Part 5
How did American political parties evolve in the 1960s? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains how both the Democratic and Republican political parties evolved due to the social changes of the 1960s.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4952, Political Parties During the Civil War Era: The Evolution of Political Parties, Part 4
How did the modern two-party system begin to form? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains the demise of the Whigs and the rise of today's dominant political parties in this episode of 60-Second Civics.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4951, Political Parties in Jacksonian Democracy: The Evolution of Political Parties, Part 3
What caused the rise of electioneering in the United States? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains how the Federalist party split and examines the rise of Jacksonian democracy.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4950, The Evolution of Political Parties: The Evolution of Political Parties, Part 2
How did political parties come about in the early American republic? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains how the Federalists and the Democratic Republicans came to be the first two political parties in the United States.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4949, The Functions of Political Parties: The Evolution of Political Parties, Part 1
What are the functions of political parties? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains four functions of political parties in this episode of 60-Second Civics.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4948, Beyond the Legacy: Civil Rights, Part 6
How did the decisions of America's Founders and the Framers of the Constitution shape the battle for civil rights? In this extended bonus episode of the podcast, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, provides a detailed account of the struggle for civil rights for Black Americans from the founding period to today.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4947, Civil Rights Challenges Today: Civil Rights, Part 5
What is the most pressing challenge for civil rights today? In this episode of 60-Second Civics, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains the challenges obstacles to full equality in the United States today.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4946, Brown v. Board of Education: Civil Rights, Part 4
How was segregation in public schools found to be unconstitutional? In this episode of 60-Second Civics, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains the landmark case of Brown v. Board of Education, which determined that separate schools for Black and White children was inherently unequal.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4945, The Reconstruction Amendments: Civil Rights, Part 3
How did the Reconstruction Amendments set the stage for the ongoing battle for civil rights? In this episode of 60-Second Civics, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4944, Frederick Douglass's Speech: Civil Rights, Part 2
How does Frederick Douglass's speech, andquot;What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?,andquot; capture the struggle for civil rights before the Civil War? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains the 1852 speech by abolitionist Frederick Douglass, who himself had one been enslaved.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4943, Civil Rights at the Founding: Civil Rights, Part 1
What were civil rights at our country's founding? Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains the status of civil rights during America's founding period and how some Blacks responded to the Declaration of Independence and the outbreak of the Revolutionary War.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4942, Passing the Buck and Pointing the Finger: Balance of Powers, Part 13
Why has Congress adopted a passing the buck and pointing the finger strategy when it comes to enacting legislation for certain responsibilities? Find out in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4941, Reasons for the Shift of Power Away from Congress: Balance of Powers, Part 12 (rebroadcast)
The balance of power shifted from Congress to the presidency during the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt and has remained there to this day. Learn what factors lead to this shift in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4940, The Shift of Power: Balance of Powers, Part 11 (rebroadcast)
From the establishment of our government under the Constitution until Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration in the 1930s, Congress dominated the national government. But then power started to shift toward the executive branch. Learn more in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4939, Physical Evidence of the Founders' Intentions: Balance of Powers, Part 10
Even the placement and design of the three branches of government in the nation's capital, Washington, D.C., provides physical evidence of the Founders' intent that Congress dominate the national government. Listen to learn more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4938, Congress and the Impeachment Power: Balance of Powers, Part 9
Evidence that the Framers intended to create a predominant Congress is apparent by how they bestowed the branch with the power to impeach the president and other high officials in the national government. Learn more in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4937, The Framers Intended Congress to Dominate: Balance of Powers, Part 8 (rebroadcast)
The Framers of the Constitution intended Congress to be the dominant branch of the national government. Why was that? Listen to learn more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4936, Limits on Each Branch of Government: Balance of Powers, Part 7
The Framers of the Constitution created a system of separated and shared powers and checks and balances to limit and control the use of power by governmental institutions and to prevent the possibility of tyranny. Learn more of each branch's ability to check the use of power by the other institutions in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4935, How the Supreme Court Shares Power: Balance of Powers, Part 6 (rebroadcast)
The Framers of the Constitution wanted to prevent a tyrannical executive in the presidency and a tyranny of a majority in Congress. But they were also careful to limit the power of the courts. Learn how in today's episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4934, How the President Shares Power: Balance of Powers, Part 5
The Framers of the Constitution made each branch of the national government share some of its primary responsibilities and powers with one or more of the other branches. For example, the president and the executive branch have the primary responsibility for carrying out and enforcing laws. Learn more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4933, How Congress Shares Power: Balance of Powers, Part 4 (rebroadcast)
The Framers of the Constitution wanted to limit the power of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the national government. So, they made each of them share some of its primary responsibilities and accompanying powers with one or more of the other branches. Listen for more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4932, How to Prevent Tyranny: Balance of Powers, Part 3 (rebroadcast)
The Framers of the Constitution were concerned about two things: first, the emergence of a tyrannical executive in the presidency and second, a tyranny of a majority in Congress. Learn how they designed a system of government to address these concerns in this episode.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4931, Congress as the Predominant Branch: Balance of Powers, Part 2
Which branch of the federal government has the most power? We explore the intentions of the Framers for how power was to be distributed among the branches in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4930, A Constitutional World Turned Upside Down: Balance of Powers, Pt 1
Today we begin a special series of podcasts to examine the question of whether power in the federal government is appropriately balanced between Congress and the executive and judicial branches. We will also learn how power has shifted from Congress to the executive and judicial branches of government and consider the implications of this shift.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4929, Public and Private Happiness: We Hold These Truths to Be Self-Evident, Part 10 (rebroadcast)
Many of our choices have social consequences and therefore have a civic dimension when they enhance or subtract from public happiness. Thus the pursuit of happiness must refer both to public and to private happiness.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4928, Self-control Is a Key to Happiness: We Hold These Truths to Be Self-Evident, Part 9 (rebroadcast)
Every day we make numerous choices in deciding what course of action will add to our well-being and what will make us happy. Making these choices is the pursuit of happiness. Learn more about this important concept in this podcast!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4927, Origin of the Pursuit of Happiness: We Hold These Truths to Be Self-Evident, Part 8
In the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson announced that every human being has andquot;certain unalienable rights,andquot; among which are those to andquot;life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.andquot; But what did Jefferson mean by andquot;the pursuit of happinessandquot;?

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4926, Rights That Cannot Be Taken Away: We Hold These Truths to Be Self-Evident, Part 7 (rebroadcast)
One key to understanding andquot;inalienableandquot; rights--as distinguished from ordinary, andquot;alienableandquot; rights--is found by turning to one of Thomas Jefferson's rough drafts of the Declaration of Independence. Listen to learn more about the foundations of your rights that cannot be taken away!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4925, Inalienable Rights: We Hold These Truths to Be Self-Evident, Part 6 (rebroadcast)
The Declaration of Independence states that andquot;all Men are...endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights.andquot; But what does andquot;unalienable Rights,andquot; or, as it was intended, andquot;inalienable Rightsandquot; mean? Learn more in this episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4924, Moral Equality: We Hold These Truths to Be Self-Evident, Part 5 (rebroadcast)
The American Founders possessed a strong sense of moral equality. Indeed, the idea of the moral equality of human beings has ancient origins. Listen to today's episode for more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4923, All Men Are Created Equal: We Hold These Truths to Be Self-Evident, Part 4 (rebroadcast)
The Declaration of Independence states that among the andquot;truthsandquot; that Americans hold to be andquot;self-evidentandquot; is that andquot;all Men are created equal.andquot; But what was meant by this statement? Learn more today!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4922, The American Mind: We Hold These Truths to Be Self-Evident, Part 3 (rebroadcast)
Thomas Jefferson said that his purpose in writing the Declaration of Independence was to express a shared understanding of the American mind. Learn more about this term and its significance today!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4921, Self-Evident Truths: We Hold These Truths to Be Self-Evident, Part 2 (rebroadcast)
That andquot;all Men are created equalandquot; and andquot;endowed by their Creator with Certain unalienable Rightsandquot; was self-evident to Americans at the time of the writing of the Declaration of Independence. Why was this? Learn more about the foundations of our self-evident truths.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4920, Independence Day: We Hold These Truths to Be Self-Evident, Part 1 (rebroadcast)
Independence Day is a time to remember and appreciate our heritage of a democratic form of government and to reflect on our country's fundamental principles.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4919, The Declaration of Independence (rebroadcast)
The Declaration of Independence announced the final, momentous step in the colonists' resistance to the British government by rejecting the sovereignty, or authority, of the Crown. Learn more about the Declaration in today's episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4918, Beyond the Legacy: Women's Rights, Part 6
In this extended episode of 60-Second Civics, Dr. Lisa Tetrault, associate professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, explains in more detail topics of women's rights from the previous five episodes. Dr. Tetrault covers the Seneca Falls Convention, the Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments, the role of Frederick Douglass, and the Equal Rights Amendment, among other topics. This is the sixth episode in our 60-Second Civics series on women's rights as part of the Center for Civic Education's Civil Discourse: An American Legacy Project.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4917, The Equal Rights Amendment: Women's Rights, Part 5
What is the Equal Rights Amendment and how would its ratification change American life? In this episode, Dr. Lisa Tetrault, associate professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, explains the Equal Rights Amendment. This is the fifth episode in our 60-Second Civics series on women's rights as part of the Center for Civic Education's Civil Discourse: An American Legacy Project.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4916, The Abortion Debate and Fundamental Rights: Women's Rights, Part 4
How does abortion relate to fundamental rights as viewed by both sides of the abortion debate? Dr. Lisa Tetrault, associate professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, explains how fundamental rights relate to the modern abortion debate. This is the fourth episode in our 60-Second Civics series on women's rights as part of the Center for Civic Education's Civil Discourse: An American Legacy Project.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4915, Minor v. Happersett: Women's Rights, Part 3
What was the impact on women and on voting rights of the 1875 case of Minor v. Happersett? Dr. Lisa Tetrault, associate professor of American history at Carnegie Mellon University, explains the 1875 Supreme Court Case of Minor v. Happersett and its importance for the women's suffrage movement. This is the third episode in our 60-Second Civics series on women's rights as part of the Center for Civic Education's Civil Discourse: An American Legacy Project.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4914, The Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments: Women's Rights, Part 2
What was the Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments and how does it relate to the Declaration of Independence? In this episode, Dr. Lisa Tetrault, associate professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, explains the historical significance of the Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4913, The Seneca Falls Convention: Women's Rights, Part 1
This is the first episode in our series on women's rights as part of our Civil Discourse and American Legacy Project. Dr. Lisa Tetrault, associate professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, explains the significance of the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4912, Beyond the Legacy: Political Parties and Conservatism in American History, Part 6
Bonus extended content! For the first time ever, 60-Second Civics is offering our listeners a bonus, long-form interview with a guest. In this extra-in-depth episode of the podcast, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, describes historical challenges with the development of factions and the two-party system of the United States.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4911, Political Parties in the 1960s: Political Parties and Conservatism in American History, Part 5
How did today's split between conservatives and liberals begin to take shape in the twentieth century. In this video, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains how today's modern political landscape began to take shape as a reaction to Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal policies and the civil rights movement and other changes of the 1960s.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4910, Political Parties During the Civil War Era: Political Parties and Conservatism in American History Pt 4
Do you know how the modern Republican party formed? In this interview, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains how the runup to the Civil War defined today's Republican and Democratic parties.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4909, Political Parties in Jacksonian Democracy: Political Parties and Conservatism in American History Pt 3
Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains how a crisis helped spur the creation of a new political party during the Andrew Jackson administration.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4908, Origins of Political Parties: Political Parties and Conservatism in American History, Part 2
In this episode of 60-Second Civics, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, speaks about the origins of political parties in the United States, which began with the very first American presidential administration: that of George Washington.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4907, Functions of Political Parties: Political Parties and Conservatism in American History, Part 1
In today's episode, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains the basic functions of political parties in the American political system.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4905, Forms of Government: Principles of the Constitution, Part 4
In this video, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains how the Framers of the Constitution thought about fundamental principles embodied in the Constitution.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4904, Forms of Government: Principles of the Constitution, Part 4
In this video, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains how the Framers of the Constitution thought about fundamental principles embodied in the Constitution.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4903, Major Issues of the Philadelphia Convention, Representative Government: Principles of the Constitution, Part 3
In this episode, Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains a critical issue at the Philadelphia Convention: how the states would be represented in government.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4902, Major Issues of the Philadelphia Convention, Separation of Power: Principles of the Constitution, Part 2
Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, explains how separation of powers was a major issue at the Philadelphia Convention, which drafted the new Constitution for the United States.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4901, The Need for a New Constitution: Principles of the Constitution, Part 1
Dr. Lester Brooks, emeritus professor of American history at Anne Arundel Community College, describes some of the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and explains why the Framers intended to amend it.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4900, The Future for LGBTQ+ Rights: LGBTQ+ Pride Week Series, Part 7
There's a number of questions that surround the rights of transgender Americans and surround the rights of other parts of the LGBTQ spectrum that are going to continue to be very important when it comes to this particular social justice movement.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4899, Obergefell v. Hodges: LGBTQ+ Pride Week Series, Part 6
There's a long history of federal cases, like Romer v. Evans and Lawrence v. Texas, that eventually lead up to Windsor v. U.S. as well as Obergefell v. Hodges, which are really the federal Supreme Court marriage equality cases that all really focus on two particular elements of the U.S. constitution.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4898, Early Legislative Victories for LGBTQ+ Rights: LGBTQ+ Pride Week Series, Part 4
Like the courts' role, the legislative branch has played a pivotal role in the LGBTQ rights movement. New York, one of the nation's largest states, was a site for an early legislative victory, and that legislation set a standard for legislative action around the country.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4897, Early Legislative Victories for LGBTQ+ Rights: LGBTQ+ Pride Week Series, Part 4
Like the courts' role, the legislative branch has played a pivotal role in the LGBTQ rights movement. New York, one of the nation's largest states, was a site for an early legislative victory, and that legislation set a standard for legislative action around the country.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4896, Goodridge: The Cinderella Moment for Marriage Equality, LGBTQ+ Pride Week Series, Part 3
Why was the 2003 Massachusetts decision in Goodridge v. Dept. of Public Health such an important moment, particularly when it comes to the role of courts in social justice movements? Find out more from Christopher R. Riano about this critical court case in the LGBTQ+ rights movement.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4895, Laying the Groundwork for LGBTQ+ Rights: LGBTQ+ Pride Week Series, Part 2
We're joined again today by Christopher R. Riano, the president of the Center for Civic Education and co-author, with William Eskridge, of Marriage Equality: From Outlaws to In-laws, winner of the American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award. We ask him: What were some early LGBTQ+ rights questions that the community faced, particularly following what happened at Stonewall?

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4894, What's Significant About the Stonewall Riots? LGBTQ+ Pride Week Series, Part 1
What were the Stonewall Riots and why are they seen as such an important milestone in the LGBTQ+ rights movement? Find out today as we launch a special weeklong series of LGBTQ+ Pride Week podcasts with our special guest, Christopher R. Riano, the president of the Center for Civic Education and co-author, along with William Eskridge, of Marriage Equality: From Outlaws to In-laws.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4893, The Eighth, Ninth, and Tenth Amendments: Introduction to the Bill of Rights, Part 5
These final pieces of the Bill of Rights deal with crime, punishment, and states rights. Listen to learn more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4892, The Sixth and Seventh Amendments: Introduction to the Bill of Rights, Part 4
Your right to an attorney, a fair trial, and more in these two amendments.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4891, The Fourth and Fifth Amendments: Introduction to the Bill of Rights, Part 3
These Constitutional Amendments help protect the rights of those convicted of a crime

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4890, The First Three Amendments: Introduction to the Bill of Rights, Part 2
These three Constitutional amendments protect some of our most fundamental rights as citizens.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4889, What is the Bill of Rights? Introduction to the Bill of Rights, Part 1
Today, December 15th, is Bill of Rights day! In recognition of this day, we start a new series exploring the first ten amendments of the Constitution and what they mean. Listen for more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4888, The Bill of Rights, Part 1: What Is the Bill of Rights?
On today's podcast, we get a brief introduction to the Bill of Rights.

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4887, Minority Consent: The Elements of Democracy, Part 16
We all know that in a democracy, the people are the rulers. But does this mean all the people? What about majority rule and the rights of minority groups? Listen to learn more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4886, Who Are the People in a Democracy? The Elements of Democracy, Part 15
Democracy means andquot;rule by the people,andquot; but who are andquot;the peopleandquot;? Find out in today's episode!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4885, Limited Powers of Democratic Governments: The Elements of Democracy, Part 14
It is an abuse of power for a democratic government to claim more powers than the people have delegated to it. Therefore, limited government is an important aspect of democracy. Listen to learn more!

60-second civics logo

60-Second Civics: Episode 4884, Alienation and Consent: The Elements of Democracy, Part 13
Many citizens in modern democracies fail to vote or participate in other ways that express their consent to be governed. This sign of alienation of individuals and groups from the political system represents a widespread problem in modern democracies. Listen for more!

About

CCE LogoThis site is brought to you by the Center for Civic Education. The Center's mission is to promote an enlightened and responsible citizenry committed to democratic principles and actively engaged in the practice of democracy. The Center has reached more than 30 million students and their teachers since 1965. Learn more.

Center for Civic Education

5115 Douglas Fir Road, Suite J
Calabasas, CA 91302

  Phone: (818) 591-9321

  Email: web@civiced.org

  Media Inquiries: cce@civiced.org

  Website: www.civiced.org

© Center for Civic Education