We the People: The Citizen & the Constitution, Level 3
Start  |  WTP  | CCE
Howard Chandler Christy, Signing of the Constitution, Architect of the Capitol, House wing, east stairway
http://www.civiced.org/wtpcompanion/hs/image/0809/0809webwtphs_cvr.jpg
Lesson 28 Primary Sources

Act of Supremacy 1533

From Wikipedia: The first Act of Supremacy granted King Henry VIII of England Royal Supremacy which is still the legal authority of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Royal Supremacy is specifically used to describe the legal sovereignty of the civil laws over religious ones, which validated Henry VIII's marriage to Anne Boleyn.

Bill of Rights, as submitted for ratification

The Bill of Rights as it was submitted to the states for ratification. It included a preamble and ten proposed amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

James Madison - Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments

James Madison's thoughts on the separation of church and state.

Kennedy's Address to the Greater Houston Ministerial Association (1960)

John F. Kennedy's famous speech on church and state given in Texas while he was campaigning for president.

Maryland Toleration Act, 1649

The Maryland Toleration Act, passed by the assembly of the Maryland colony, mandated tolerance for Christians who did not practice Anglican Christianity.

U.S. Bill of Rights (

The first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution are collectively known as the Bill of Rights. They were proposed by James Madison in 1789 as a response to Anti-Federalists, who argued that the Constitution did not protect individual liberties.

United States Bill of Rights

From Wikipedia: In the United States, the Bill of Rights is the name by which the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution are known. They were introduced by James Madison to the First United States Congress in 1789 as a series of articles, and came into effect on December 15, 1791, when they had been ratified by three quarters of the states.

United States Constitution

From Wikipedia: The Constitution of the United States of America is the supreme law of the United States. It is the foundation and source of the legal authority underlying the existence of the United States of America and the federal government of the United States.

Virginia Act for Establishing Religious Freedom

From Wikipedia: The Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom was written in 1779 by Thomas Jefferson to place a separation between church and state. In 1786, the Virginia General Assembly enacted the statute into the state's law.

Lesson 28      How Does the First Amendment Affect the Establishment and Free Exercise of Religion?
Menu Unit Lesson Section Tools











1

8

15

21


33

2

9

16

22


34

3

10

17

23


35

4

11

18

24


36

5

12

19

25


37

6

13

20

26


38

7

14







39









Search
Notes