We the People: The Citizen & the Constitution, Level 3
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Howard Chandler Christy, Signing of the Constitution, Architect of the Capitol, House wing, east stairway
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Lesson 11 Primary Sources

Federal Farmer No. 7

An Anti-Federalist essay, criticizing the proposed constitution and outlining the Federal Farmer's goals for future letters.

Federal Farmer No. 8

An Anti-Federalist argument for a federal republic with authority resting in the state governments.

Federalist No. 1

From WIkipedia: Federalist No. 1 is an essay by Alexander Hamilton and the first of the Federalist Papers, a preface in broad terms of the forthcoming arguments in favor of the proposed constitution.

Federalist No. 10

From Wikipedia: Federalist No. 10 is an essay by James Madison arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution. It addresses the question of how to guard against "factions" with interests contrary to the rights of others or the interests of the whole community.

Federalist No. 33

Hamilton's arguments in favor of the necessary and proper clause and the supremacy clause.

Federalist No. 37

From Wikipedia: Federalist No. 37 is an essay by James Madison, published on January 11, 1788 discussing some of the political questions raised at the Constitutional Convention, such as the question of the authority of the state versus the liberty of the people.

Federalist No. 48

From Wikipedia: Federalist No. 48 is an essay by James Madison, building on Federalist No. 47 in which Madison argued for separation of powers; in this one he argues that the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government must not be totally divided.

Federalist No. 51

From Wikipedia: Federalist No. 51 is an essay by James Madison, published on February 6, 1788. No. 51 addresses means by which appropriate checks and balances can be created in government.

Federalist No. 71

From Wikipedia: Federalist No. 71 is an essay by Alexander Hamilton, titled, "The Duration in Office of the Executive," published on March 18, 1788. It is the fifth in a series of 11 essays discussing the powers and limitations of the executive branch.

Great Compromise of 1787

From Wikipedia: The Connecticut Compromise, also known as the Great Compromise, was an agreement between large and small states reached during the Philadelphia Convention of 1787 that resulted in a bicameral legislature.

James Madison's Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787

Madison's notes on the debate over properly representing states in the proposed legislature.

James Madison's Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787

Madison's notes on the debate over bicameralism in the proposed legislature.

Luther Martin: Address No. 4

Martin's letter to the citizens of Maryland warning of entrusting too much power to the government.

Luther Martin: Genuine Information No. 12 (1788)

Martin's extensive criticism of the Philadelphia Convention, its methods and its work.

United States Constitution

From Wikipedia: The Constitution of the United States of America is the supreme law of the United States. It is the foundation and source of the legal authority underlying the existence of the United States of America and the federal government of the United States.

Lesson 11      What Questions Did the Framers Consider in Designing the Three Branches of the National Government?
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