The Founders Perspective on Presidential Power Print E-mail
In the first of several forthcoming lectures on the Constitution and presidential power, this talk focuses on the Framers'
discussions and debates surrounding presidential power. Influenced by their own experiences under King George III
and their keen study of history, the Framers feared executive power yet recognized the need for a presidency strong
enough to defend its position and powers in the separation of powers configuration that they were developing. This
lecture examines, among other things, the foreign affairs and national security powers vested in the president and
the president's role in war-making.
adler View Webinar

Register
Scholar:
David Gray Adler is the of Director of the Andrus Center for Public Policy at Boise State University, where he
serves as the Cecil D. Andrus Professor of Public Affairs. He will continue to teach courses on constitutional law
and the Supreme Court for the University of Idaho's College of Law. A recipient of numerous teaching, writing
and civic awards, Adler is the widely-cited author of five books and more than 100 scholarly articles. He has
lectured nationally and internationally on the Constitution and presidential power, including lectures at more than
30 colleges and universities.
divide b
CEU Requirements:
  • View webinar
  • Review primary documents
  • Write a 1,000 word essay
  • Interact with Kansas State University professors
  • Receive certificate for 10 hour units from Kansas State University
  • Register
Primary Documents:
Article II
Federalist #51
Federalist #69
Federalist #70
Federalist #74
Federalist #75
Antifederalist #67

Essay Question:
How and why has presidential power expanded since the ratification of the Constitution?
  • How have wars, emergencies, and the media contributed to the expansion of presidential powers?
  • How have the other branches of government responded to the expansion of presidential power? Do you think they have done so adequately? Why or why not?

divide b

   Need graduate credit?
KSU logo-2682




divide b