Apply for the James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation’s Graduate Fellowships

Jan 17, 2018 / E-news

Are you an educator interested in graduate school with a love for the Constitution? Apply for the James Madison Foundation’s Graduate Fellowships! One individual per state per year can win $24,000 toward becoming teachers of the American Constitution at the secondary school level.
Graduate fellows can choose their own university and program of study and will also be attendees of an all expenses paid four week summer institute in Washington, D.C. The summer institute brings together an elite group of scholars who encourage a spirit of inquiry and discovery that James Madison fellows will eventually bestow on their own students. Upon completing a master’s degree in history, political science, or education, graduates will go on to use their skills as social studies teachers. Applications are due March 1, 2018. Find more information and the application at the James Madison Foundation website.
The James Madison Foundation’s mission is to encourage study of the United States Constitution, its roots, its formation, its principles, and its development. Created by Congress in 1986, the Foundation is an independent agency of the Executive Branch of the federal government.

Are you an educator interested in graduate school with a love for the Constitution? Apply for the James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation’s Graduate Fellowships! One individual per state per year can win $24,000 toward becoming teachers of the American Constitution at the secondary school level.

Graduate fellows can choose their own university and program of study and will also be attendees of an all expenses paid four week summer institute in Washington, D.C. The summer institute brings together an elite group of scholars who encourage a spirit of inquiry and discovery that James Madison fellows will eventually bestow on their own students. Upon completing a master’s degree in history, political science, or education, graduates will go on to use their skills as social studies teachers. Applications are due March 1, 2018. Find more information and the application at the James Madison Foundation website.

The James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation’s mission is to encourage study of the United States Constitution, its roots, its formation, its principles, and its development. Created by Congress in 1986, the Foundation is an independent agency of the Executive Branch of the federal government.

Center for the Study of Federalism Offers $2500 Teaching Awards on Federalism

Jan 16, 2018 / E-news

Does federalism still matter? The Center for the Study of Federalism says yes! CSF will be awarding three teachers with $2500 each for unit plans focusing on federalism in the United States.
Middle and high school teachers can participate by creating unit plans that address the question, “Does federalism still matter?” Defined as the distribution of power in an organization between a central authority and the constituent, federalism in the U.S. is a complicated concept about balancing power between national and state governments. Unit plans should contain five to seven lesson plans that are adaptable for other teachers across the country and winning unit plans will be published on the CSF website. Within the theme of federalism, applicants may be creative and explore the subject area from a number of perspectives. For instance, a specific policy area, policy debates, or the policy-making process may be interesting angles from which students can grapple with issues relating to federalism.
For more information about the unit plan format and evaluation criteria, check out the Center for the Study of Federalism’s website.

Does federalism still matter? The Center for the Study of Federalism says yes! CSF will be awarding three teachers with $2500 each for unit plans focusing on federalism in the United States.

Middle and high school teachers can participate by creating unit plans that address the question, “Does federalism still matter?” Defined as the distribution of power in an organization between a central authority and the constituent, federalism in the U.S. is a complicated concept about balancing power between national and state governments.

Unit plans should contain five to seven lesson plans that are adaptable for other teachers across the country and winning unit plans will be published on the CSF website. Within the theme of federalism, applicants may be creative and explore the subject area from a number of perspectives. For instance, a specific policy area, policy debates, or the policy-making process may be interesting angles from which students can grapple with issues relating to federalism.

For more information about the unit plan format and evaluation criteria, check out the Center for the Study of Federalism’s website.

Got a Question About the Constitution? Ask John!

Jan 12, 2018 / E-news

The Ask John Project, a vital tool for students preparing for the We the People state finals, is available on the Center for Civic Education’s website!
The project consists of videos in which Professor John P. Kaminski of the Center for the Study of the American Constitution answers student questions about the 2017-18 We the People state hearing questions. He addressed questions submitted by We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution students from all over the nation as they participated in the program and prepared for their 2017–18 We the People state competitions. Questions range from “Why did it take three years to draft the Articles of Confederation?” to “Is common law synonymous to having an unwritten constitution?”
Kaminski teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is the founder/director of the Center for the Study of the American Constitution. His expertise in period and constitutional history is displayed in dozens of articles and books he has written on civics, American government and history, and the Founders, as well as his editing work on The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution.
The Ask John Project can also be found on YouTube and Facebook.

The Ask John Project, a vital tool for students preparing for the We the People state finals, is available on the Center for Civic Education’s website!

The project consists of videos in which Professor John P. Kaminski of the Center for the Study of the American Constitution answers student questions about the 2017-18 We the People state hearing questions. He addressed questions submitted by We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution students from all over the nation as they participated in the program and prepared for their 2017–18 We the People state competitions. Questions range from “Why did it take three years to draft the Articles of Confederation?” to “Is common law synonymous to having an unwritten constitution?”

Kaminski teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is the founder and director of the Center for the Study of the American Constitution. His expertise in period and constitutional history is displayed in dozens of articles and books he has written on civics, American government and history, and the Founders, as well as his editing work on The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution.

The Ask John Project can also be found on YouTube and Facebook.

Freedom of Expression: Why and How Should It Be Taught? by Charles N. Quigley

Nov 20, 2017 / E-news

Freedom of Expression: Why and How Should It Be Taught?
Charles N. Quigley, Executive Director
Center for Civic Education
Why should freedom of expression be taught? Adolph Hitler, leader of the Nazi Party, took power in 1933 when he became chancellor of the German government. His death in 1945 marked the end of his absolute rule as dictator of the German people. He precipitated one of the worst periods in human history, in which millions of people died not only on the battlefield, but also in his attempt to eliminate all of the Jews in Europe as well as homosexuals, gypsies, and the mentally ill and handicapped, who were considered “needless eaters.” He began the first year of his reign by eliminating the political opposition. An early step he took to attain this goal was to eliminate all of the protections for freedom of expression and due process of law in the German constitution. The following decree was issued by the Reich president in 1933.
Articles 114, 115, 117, 118, 123, 124, and 153 of the Constitution of the German Reich are suspended until further notice. Thus, restrictions on personal liberty, on the right of free expression of opinion, including freedom of the press, on the right of assembly and the right of association, and violations of the privacy of postal, telegraphic, and telephonic communications, and warrants for house searches, orders for confiscations as well as restrictions on property are also permissible beyond the legal limits otherwise prescribed.
This was followed almost immediately by the imprisonment in concentration camps of Germans who opposed Hitler and the Nazi Party. Martin Niemöller was a pastor in the German Evangelical (Lutheran) Church, an early supporter of Hitler who later turned against him. He was imprisoned in German concentration camps, including Dachau, from 1936 to 1945, when he was freed by Allied forces. He has been quoted as saying,
In Germany, they first came for the Communists, and I did not speak up, because I was not a Communist. Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak up, because I was not a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak up, because I was not a trade unionist. Then they came for the Catholics, and I did not speak up, because I was a Protestant. Then they came for me … and by that time, no one was left to speak up.
This tragic episode in history is not the only time those in power have tried to suppress freedom of expression by people critical of their rule. It happened in our country shortly after it began when Congress passed the four Alien and Sedition Acts, which were signed into law by Federalist president John Adams. They made it more difficult for immigrants to become citizens, gave the president the power to put noncitizens in prison who they thought might be dangerous or were from a hostile nation and made it a crime to make “false” statements critical of the federal government. Among other things, the Acts were intended to suppress the right to freedom of expression of the opposing Democratic-Republican Party formed by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison.
Imagine a charismatic leader in power in America acting to suspend or erode our Constitution’s protections of our freedom of expression, our due process protections from unreasonable and unfair searches and seizures by government and our right to the equal protection of the laws regardless of the groups to which we might belong. Could it happen here? How strong are our political institutions? How deeply ingrained among us is an understanding of and commitment to the fundamental principles and values of the Declaration of Independence and Constitution and its amendments. To what extent do liberty and equality lie in the hearts and minds of the American people and their elected representatives as a bulwark against the suppression of their liberties and denial of the ideal that “all men are created equal”?
How should freedom of expression be taught? The American philosopher George Santayana once wrote, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” Unfortunately, too many Americans not only don’t remember the past, they are not aware of it. They are not well-versed in American history or the evolution of the American political system and its European antecedents. Lessons like those of Nazi Germany rarely come to mind when issues of freedom of expression, its proper scope and limits and threats to it arise. So, a knowledge of the history and centrality of freedom of expression to a free society, at least in western civilization, is an essential foundation for becoming an informed citizen in the United States.
This historical understanding should be accompanied by a conceptual understanding derived from philosophy and jurisprudence. For example, the justifications for widespread freedom of expression from John Stuart Mill’s “On Liberty” and other outstanding sources of political thought undergirding American constitutional democracy should be familiar to American students. This should be accompanied by an examination of the proper scope and limits of freedom of expression derived at least in part from an examination of landmark Supreme Court decisions on the topic. All inquiry should take place in the light of free and open discussion and debate in which a wide range of reasonable differences of position and opinion are encouraged and respected.
The burden of responsibility for the enlightening of our young people regarding the precious rights to freedom of expression they have inherited and a disposition to cherish them, exercise them competently and responsibly and protect them lies with the dedicated teachers of our school systems, many of whom are carrying out this responsibility daily in their classroom using the We the People Programs of the Center for Civic Education and those of other outstanding contributors to the field.

Why should freedom of expression be taught? Adolph Hitler, leader of the Nazi Party, took power in 1933 when he became chancellor of the German government. His death in 1945 marked the end of his absolute rule as dictator of the German people. He precipitated one of the worst periods in human history, in which millions of people died not only on the battlefield, but also in his attempt to eliminate all of the Jews in Europe as well as homosexuals, gypsies, and the mentally ill and handicapped, who were considered “needless eaters.” He began the first year of his reign by eliminating the political opposition. An early step he took to attain this goal was to eliminate all of the protections for freedom of expression and due process of law in the German constitution. The following decree was issued by the Reich president in 1933.

Articles 114, 115, 117, 118, 123, 124, and 153 of the Constitution of the German Reich are suspended until further notice. Thus, restrictions on personal liberty, on the right of free expression of opinion, including freedom of the press, on the right of assembly and the right of association, and violations of the privacy of postal, telegraphic, and telephonic communications, and warrants for house searches, orders for confiscations as well as restrictions on property are also permissible beyond the legal limits otherwise prescribed.

This was followed almost immediately by the imprisonment in concentration camps of Germans who opposed Hitler and the Nazi Party. Martin Niemöller was a pastor in the German Evangelical (Lutheran) Church, an early supporter of Hitler who later turned against him. He was imprisoned in German concentration camps, including Dachau, from 1936 to 1945, when he was freed by Allied forces. He has been quoted as saying,

In Germany, they first came for the Communists, and I did not speak up, because I was not a Communist. Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak up, because I was not a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak up, because I was not a trade unionist. Then they came for the Catholics, and I did not speak up, because I was a Protestant. Then they came for me … and by that time, no one was left to speak up.

Martin Niemöller, a German evangelical pastor

This tragic episode in history is not the only time those in power have tried to suppress freedom of expression by people critical of their rule. It happened in our country shortly after it began when Congress passed the four Alien and Sedition Acts, which were signed into law by Federalist president John Adams. They made it more difficult for immigrants to become citizens, gave the president the power to put noncitizens in prison who they thought might be dangerous or were from a hostile nation and made it a crime to make “false” statements critical of the federal government. Among other things, the Acts were intended to suppress the right to freedom of expression of the opposing Democratic-Republican Party formed by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison.

Imagine a charismatic leader in power in America acting to suspend or erode our Constitution’s protections of our freedom of expression, our due process protections from unreasonable and unfair searches and seizures by government and our right to the equal protection of the laws regardless of the groups to which we might belong. Could it happen here? How strong are our political institutions? How deeply ingrained among us is an understanding of and commitment to the fundamental principles and values of the Declaration of Independence and Constitution and its amendments. To what extent do liberty and equality lie in the hearts and minds of the American people and their elected representatives as a bulwark against the suppression of their liberties and denial of the ideal that “all men are created equal”?

American philosopher George Santayana

How should freedom of expression be taught? The American philosopher George Santayana once wrote, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” Unfortunately, too many Americans not only don’t remember the past, they are not aware of it. They are not well-versed in American history or the evolution of the American political system and its European antecedents. Lessons like those of Nazi Germany rarely come to mind when issues of freedom of expression, its proper scope and limits and threats to it arise. So, a knowledge of the history and centrality of freedom of expression to a free society, at least in western civilization, is an essential foundation for becoming an informed citizen in the United States.

This historical understanding should be accompanied by a conceptual understanding derived from philosophy and jurisprudence. For example, the justifications for widespread freedom of expression from John Stuart Mill’s “On Liberty” and other outstanding sources of political thought undergirding American constitutional democracy should be familiar to American students. This should be accompanied by an examination of the proper scope and limits of freedom of expression derived at least in part from an examination of landmark Supreme Court decisions on the topic. All inquiry should take place in the light of free and open discussion and debate in which a wide range of reasonable differences of position and opinion are encouraged and respected.

The burden of responsibility for the enlightening of our young people regarding the precious rights to freedom of expression they have inherited and a disposition to cherish them, exercise them competently and responsibly and protect them lies with the dedicated teachers of our school systems, many of whom are carrying out this responsibility daily in their classroom using the We the People Programs of the Center for Civic Education and those of other outstanding contributors to the field.

This article originally appeared in the Washington Times on October 25, 2017, as part of a special The President and the Constitution section.

Apply by March 15 for the American Lawyer’s Alliance Law-Related Teacher of the Year Award

Nov 20, 2017 / E-news

Each year, the American Lawyers Alliance recognizes three teachers of law-related education as the American Lawyers Alliance Teachers of the Year. Applications are now being accepted for the 2018 American Lawyer’s Alliance Law-Related Teacher of the Year Award! Nominate the teacher you know who goes above and beyond to develop programs that help promote an informed citizenry and enhance education related to the judicial and legal systems. David Alcox and Fred Cole, We the People teachers, won two of the three awards in 2017. Read more about these amazing teachers.

Learn more about the awards and how to nominate a teacher in your life here.

Teachers in Alaska Participate in JMLP workshops

Nov 15, 2017 / E-news, James Madison Legacy Project

Teachers met in Chevak, Alaska, to participate in the James Madison Legacy Project (JMLP) professional development workshop. They learned strategies for teaching We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution to their students by role-playing a mock congressional hearing and hearing from speakers, such as an Alaska Supreme Court Justice. “This workshop offers content and engagement. The interactive activities were very strong reinforcement of the material taught to the class,” said one JMLP teacher.
The teachers presented to their school board explaining the We the People program and its benefits to students. Minty Ruthford, Mary Ulroan, and Valeria Owrey, had their students become part of the presentation through a candy bar simulated congressional hearing. Each group of students picked a candy that they felt best represented the United States and presented to their class and three judges.
Students argued for a variety of candies. “Peanut M&M’s are red, green, brown, yellow and blue and this represents the diversity of America because there are so people from so many different backgrounds,” said one group. Another group argued for Hot Tamales because, “Hot Tamales are made in Pennsylvania just like America’s Declaration of Independence.”
As classrooms move from candy bar hearings to their real mock congressional hearings, Alaska’s JMLP teachers are confident that the We the People curriculum “gets kids to become more involved in their community and to practice their citizenship both inside the school and out.”

Teachers met in Anchorage, Alaska, to participate in the James Madison Legacy Project (JMLP) professional development workshop. They learned strategies for teaching We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution to their students by role-playing a simulated congressional hearing and hearing from speakers, such as Alaska Supreme Court Justice Joel Bolger. “This workshop offers content and engagement. The interactive activities were very strong reinforcement of the material taught to the class,” said one JMLP teacher.

JMLP Teachers Role-Play a Mock Congressional Hearing

JMLP Teachers Role-Play a Mock Congressional Hearing

The teachers presented to their school board explaining the We the People program and its benefits to students. Teachers Minty Ruthford, Mary Ulroan, and Valeria Owrey, had their students become part of the presentation through a candy bar simulated congressional hearing. Each group of students picked a candy that they felt best represented the United States and presented to their class and three judges.

Students argued for a variety of candies. “Peanut M&M’s are red, green, brown, yellow and blue and this represents the diversity of America because there are so people from so many different backgrounds,” said one group. Another group argued for Hot Tamales because, “Hot Tamales are made in Pennsylvania just like America’s Declaration of Independence.”

As classrooms move from candy bar hearings to their real mock congressional hearings, Alaska’s JMLP teachers are confident that the We the People curriculum “gets kids to become more involved in their community and to practice their citizenship both inside the school and out.”

Robert Leming Speaks at Birmingham Seminar on Civil Rights

Nov 15, 2017 / E-news, We the People

Robert Leming, Director of the Center’s We the People programs, spoke at this year’s Birmingham Seminar on Civil Rights.
In his opening remarks, he honored those who fought for the cause of human rights. “We are here this weekend to honor those who were involved in the struggle, those who suffered discrimination, and those who given their lives for the cause … I am looking forward to this weekend with you, because I believe you are about love. You love your country, you love your families, you love your students, and you understand the importance of civic education.”
The Center for Civic Education has invited hundred of civic educators to experience the Birmingham Civil Rights Seminar to cultivate relationships with civil rights leaders and other educators. This year, Ms. Carolyn McKinstry, Ms. Janis Kelsey, Mr. William Collins, Ms. Martha Bouyer, Mr. Doug Jones, and Mr. William Baxley—who were personally involved in the Civil Rights Movement—were some of the leaders who attended the seminar.
The seminar was sponsored by the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Birmingham Division. Speakers’ highlighted the weekend’s theme of hate crimes speaking on the tragic massacre at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in 2015; the murder of a transgender woman named Mercedes Williamson; and the history of hate.
For more on the 2017 Seminar on Civil Rights, check out the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute.

Robert Leming, Director of the Center’s We the People programs, spoke at this year’s Birmingham Seminar on Civil Rights.

In his opening remarks, he honored those who fought for the cause of human rights. “We are here this weekend to honor those who were involved in the struggle, those who suffered discrimination, and those who given their lives for the cause … I am looking forward to this weekend with you, because I believe you are about love. You love your country, you love your families, you love your students, and you understand the importance of civic education.”

The Center for Civic Education has invited hundred of civic educators to experience the Birmingham Civil Rights Seminar to cultivate relationships with civil rights leaders and other educators. This year, Ms. Carolyn McKinstry, Ms. Janis Kelsey, Mr. William Collins, Ms. Martha Bouyer, Mr. Doug Jones, and Mr. William Baxley—who were personally involved in the civil rights movement—were some of the leaders who attended the seminar.

Three members from Charleston Carolina the spoke about their roles in the Case of the Emanuel AME.

Three members from Charleston, South Carolina, spoke about their roles in the case of the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church.

The seminar was sponsored by the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Birmingham Division. Speakers’ highlighted the weekend’s theme of hate crimes speaking on the tragic massacre at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in 2015; the murder of a transgender woman named Mercedes Williamson; and the history of hate.

For more on the 2017 Seminar on Civil Rights, check out the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute.

Southern Nevada Holds Fourth Annual We the People Boot Camp

Nov 14, 2017 / E-news, We the People

The fourth annual We the People Boot Camp for Nevada Congressional Districts 1, 3, and 4 took place October 14, 2017 at Spring Valley High School in Las Vegas, Nevada.
More than 300 students and 25 teachers participated. Presenters included District Coordinators Debbie Berger, Trey Delap, and Michael Vannozzi, Judge Elissa Cadish, Professors Rachel Anderson (UNLV), Sondra Cosgrove (College of Southern Nevada) and David Tanenhaus (UNLV), Assemblyman Lynn Stewart, Faiss Middle School Principal Roger West, Canyon Springs teacher Dr. Lou Grillo, and Clark County School District Social Studies Coordinator Jaynie Malorni. Congressman Ruben Kihuen’s Assistant Ashley Garcia was also on hand for the Boot Camp demonstration and workshops.
Professor Tanenhaus said that, for him, the highlight of the event was watching young people discover how relevant what they’ve been learning is to the world around them. “The students [were] working in groups to discuss how the most talked about stories in the news all related to constitutional elements,” he explained. Those events included the ongoing controversy about the National Football League (NFL) and the recent Vegas massacre. “They realized that the We the People curriculum gave them the vocabulary they needed to discuss these connections.”
The president of Nevada’s League of Women Voters, Professor Sondra Cosgrove, was also impressed with the level at which participating students were working. “In [my] sessions, the students were highly motivated and eager to ask questions and share information,” she said. “We discussed research methods for leveraging online resources, as well as criteria for judging resource reliability. The students demonstrated a wide-range of research experience and constitutional knowledge, and a willingness to engage in debate.”
Vannozzi, a coordinator for District 4, was equally impressed. Working in small groups for just 15 minutes, he tasked his students with researching and composing answers to questions. The students then chose representatives from each group to present their answers in no more than 90 seconds. “The results were fantastic!” Vannozzi enthused. “Afterward, I had several teachers tell me that they will use our ‘sample follow-up question’ exercise in their own classrooms.”
Many of the students found the day valuable and said that it allowed them to become more comfortable with the hearing process, and the question and answer sessions. They also got to practice connecting current events with the U.S. Constitution using social media, technology, and other research tools.

The fourth annual We the People Boot Camp for Nevada Congressional Districts 1, 3, and 4 took place October 14, 2017 at Spring Valley High School in Las Vegas, Nevada.

More than 300 students and 25 teachers participated. Presenters included District Coordinators Debbie Berger, Trey Delap, and Michael Vannozzi, Judge Elissa Cadish, Professors Rachel Anderson (UNLV), Sondra Cosgrove (College of Southern Nevada) and David Tanenhaus (UNLV), Assemblyman Lynn Stewart, Faiss Middle School Principal Roger West, Canyon Springs teacher Dr. Lou Grillo, and Clark County School District Social Studies Coordinator Jaynie Malorni. Congressman Ruben Kihuen’s Assistant Ashley Garcia was also on hand for the Boot Camp demonstration and workshops.

Professor Tanenhaus said that, for him, the highlight of the event was watching young people discover how relevant what they’ve been learning is to the world around them. “The students [were] working in groups to discuss how the most talked about stories in the news all related to constitutional elements,” he explained. Those events included the ongoing controversy about the National Football League (NFL) and the recent Vegas massacre. “They realized that the We the People curriculum gave them the vocabulary they needed to discuss these connections.”

Jayne Malorni, Roger West, and Dr. Lou Grillo demonstrate WTP Hearing

Jayne Malorni, Roger West, and Dr. Lou Grillo demonstrate WTP Hearing

The president of Nevada’s League of Women Voters, Professor Sondra Cosgrove, was also impressed with the level at which participating students were working. “In [my] sessions, the students were highly motivated and eager to ask questions and share information,” she said. “We discussed research methods for leveraging online resources, as well as criteria for judging resource reliability. The students demonstrated a wide-range of research experience and constitutional knowledge, and a willingness to engage in debate.”

Vannozzi, a coordinator for District 4, was equally impressed. Working in small groups for just 15 minutes, he tasked his students with researching and composing answers to questions. The students then chose representatives from each group to present their answers in no more than 90 seconds. “The results were fantastic!” Vannozzi enthused. “Afterward, I had several teachers tell me that they will use our ‘sample follow-up question’ exercise in their own classrooms.”

Many of the students found the day valuable and said that it allowed them to become more comfortable with the hearing process, and the question and answer sessions. They also got to practice connecting current events with the U.S. Constitution using social media, technology, and other research tools.

Lyceum Scholars Program Helps Students Interested in the American Founding

Nov 13, 2017 / E-news

The Lyceum Scholars Program at Clemson University in South Carolina
This unique program offers $10,000 scholarships to incoming Clemson University freshmen for Fall 2018.
The Lyceum Scholars Program offers ten $10,000 scholarships to incoming Clemson University freshmen. The program uses a “Great Books” approach to studying the history of liberty, the American Founding, and the idea of moral character.   Scholars take a series of eight hierarchically-structured courses (one per semester) as an intellectual cohort over their four years at Clemson.  Students take classes including ‘Introduction to Political Theory’, ‘Wisdom of the Ancients’ and ‘Political Theory of Capitalism’ and read works such as Plato’s Republic, Cicero’s On Duties, Adam Smith’s The Wealth of Nations and Friedman’s Capitalism and Freedom.  Open to any major, the Lyceum Scholars Program awards a minor in Political Science and prepares students for careers in law, academia, policy making and business.
Because the program emphasizes moral character, Lyceum Scholars are assigned Socratic Tutors who guide students as they apply classroom theory to their own lives.
The priority application deadline for incoming Fall 2018 freshmen is December 11, 2017.  Students accepted into the Lyceum Scholars Program receive $10,000 scholarships to Clemson University.
Please share this opportunity with your best students.  If you have specific seniors in mind, please recommend them on our website here: www.clemson.edu/capitalism/teachers.html.
More information and an application are on our website, including a digital flyer for distribution that describes the program.  Questions? Contact lyceum@clemson.edu.

The Lyceum Scholars Program offers ten $10,000 scholarships to incoming Clemson University freshmen. The program uses a “Great Books” approach to studying the history of liberty, the American Founding, and the idea of moral character. Scholars take a series of eight hierarchically-structured courses (one per semester) as an intellectual cohort over their four years at Clemson. Students take classes including “Introduction to Political Theory,” “Wisdom of the Ancients,” and “Political Theory of Capitalism” and read works such as Plato’s Republic, Cicero’s On Duties, Adam Smith’s The Wealth of Nations and Friedman’s Capitalism and Freedom. Open to any major, the Lyceum Scholars Program awards a minor in Political Science and prepares students for careers in law, academia, policy making and business.

Because the program emphasizes moral character, Lyceum Scholars are assigned Socratic Tutors who guide students as they apply classroom theory to their own lives.

The priority application deadline for incoming Fall 2018 freshmen is December 11, 2017.  Students accepted into the Lyceum Scholars Program receive $10,000 scholarships to Clemson University.

Please share this opportunity with your best students.  If you have specific seniors in mind, please recommend them on our website here.

More information and an application are on the website, including a digital flyer for distribution that describes the program. Questions? Contact lyceum@clemson.edu.

American Judges Foundation Gives Grant to We the People

Oct 04, 2017 / E-news, We the People

The Center would like to acknowledge the continuing generosity of the American Judges Foundation (AJF). The Foundation voted at its annual meeting in Toronto to increase this year’s contribution to the Center for Civic Education for the We the People program to $5,000 to support the We the People program. They have also made it an ongoing donation. In her gracious remarks, Judge Catherine Shaffer said, “This outstanding nonpartisan organization provides top notch civic educational opportunities for students across the United States via its highly praised ‘We the People’ program. Keep up your wonderful work!”

The Center thanks Judge Shaffer and her many colleagues in the American Judges Association (AJA) not only for the grant but, more importantly, for the extraordinary services they have continued to render over the years as scholars and volunteer judges for the We the People program. Judge Shaffer is a King County Superior Court judge and currently serves as the AJA President-Elect. She has a long history as a participant in the We the People program, for years having served as a judge at the Washington State Finals and also as a judge at the National Finals competitions.

The American Judges Association is the only judicial organization that represents judges from both Canada and the United States and is the largest judges-only association in the US. Civic education and judicial education are central to its mission. Its members include a cross section of judges from all levels of courts with all levels of jurisdiction—a diverse group that, when united, speaks as the “Voice of the Judiciary.”
For additional information please contact John Hale at the Center.

The Center would like to acknowledge the continuing generosity of the American Judges Foundation (AJF). The Foundation voted at its annual meeting in Toronto to increase this year’s contribution to the Center for Civic Education for the We the People program to $5,000 to support the We the People program. They have also made it an ongoing donation. In her gracious remarks, Judge Catherine Shaffer said, “This outstanding nonpartisan organization provides top notch civic educational opportunities for students across the United States via its highly praised ‘We the People’ program. Keep up your wonderful work!”

The Center thanks Judge Shaffer and her many colleagues in the American Judges Association (AJA) not only for the grant but, more importantly, for the extraordinary services they have continued to render over the years as scholars and volunteer judges for the We the People program. Judge Shaffer is a King County Superior Court judge and currently serves as the AJA President-Elect. She has a long history as a participant in the We the People program, for years having served as a judge at the Washington State Finals and also as a judge at the National Finals competitions.

The American Judges Association is the only judicial organization that represents judges from both Canada and the United States and is the largest judges-only association in the US. Civic education and judicial education are central to its mission. Its members include a cross section of judges from all levels of courts with all levels of jurisdiction—a diverse group that, when united, speaks as the “Voice of the Judiciary.”

For additional information please contact John Hale at the Center.