Third Annual JMLP Meeting Brings Together Mentors and Coordinators

Mar 20, 2018 / E-news

Approximately one hundred state coordinators and mentor teachers traveled from across the country to meet for the third annual James Madison Legacy Project meeting from February 23–25, 2018 in Los Angeles. The project, made possible by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education through the Supporting Effective Educator Development program, focuses on giving teachers of high-need students quality professional development in civics and government.
The weekend featured Dr. Gary Nash, distinguished research professor from the University of California, Los Angeles, who gave a riveting lecture on the American Revolution, the subject of his book The Unknown American Revolution: The Unruly Lighthouse Birth of Democracy and the Struggle to Create America. Mentors and coordinators also engaged with Natalie Saaris from Actively Learn, who walked the audience through the innovative platform that now hosts the new We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution enhanced ebook.
The weekend gave participants opportunities to meet with their peers in intensive group discussions and planning sessions with a focus on preparing for teacher professional development events they are hosting this summer and beyond. The coordinators and mentors discussed effective means to sustain online teacher professional learning communities in their states, and how to expand teacher professional development through the use of James Madison Legacy Project online resources, including videos of leading constitutional scholars.
Dr. Diana Owen, Associate Professor of Political Science at Georgetown University, presented research findings on the first two years of the James Madison Legacy Project. Mentors and coordinators were excited to hear that middle school and high school teachers showed demonstrative improvement in their civics content knowledge after participating in JMLP. The students were not left behind! Students whose teachers participated in JMLP gained significantly more civic knowledge than students whose teachers were not part of the program.
Mentors and state coordinators worked hard all weekend long, proving exactly why the project is yielding such impressive results!
Click on the video below to see highlights of the meeting!

Approximately one hundred state coordinators and mentor teachers traveled from across the country for the third annual James Madison Legacy Project meeting from February 23–25, 2018 in Los Angeles. The project, made possible by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education through the Supporting Effective Educator Development program, focuses on giving teachers of high-need students quality professional development in civics and government.

Mentors and coordinators met in California for the 2018 JMLP Meeting.

Mentors and coordinators met in California for the 2018 JMLP Meeting.

The weekend featured Dr. Gary Nash, distinguished research professor from the University of California, Los Angeles, who gave a riveting lecture on the American Revolution, the subject of his book The Unknown American Revolution: The Unruly Birth of Democracy and the Struggle to Create America. Mentors and coordinators also engaged with Natalie Saaris from Actively Learn, who walked the audience through the innovative platform that now hosts the new We the People: The Citizen & the Constitution middle and high school enhanced ebooks.

Dr. Gary Nash presented on American history.

Dr. Gary Nash presented on American history.

The weekend gave participants opportunities to meet with their peers in intensive group discussions and planning sessions with a focus on preparing for teacher professional development events they are hosting this summer and beyond. The coordinators and mentors discussed effective means to sustain online teacher professional learning communities in their states, and how to expand teacher professional development through the use of James Madison Legacy Project online resources, including videos of leading constitutional scholars.

Dr. Diana Owen, associate professor of political science at Georgetown University, presented research findings on the first two years of the James Madison Legacy Project. Mentors and coordinators were excited to hear that middle school and high school teachers demonstrated improvement in their civics content knowledge after participating in JMLP. The students were not left behind! Students whose teachers participated in JMLP gained significantly more civic knowledge than students whose teachers were not part of the program.

Mentors and state coordinators worked hard all weekend long, proving exactly why the project is yielding such impressive results! See pictures from the event on our Flickr!

2018 JMLP Meeting

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