Center for the Study of Federalism Offers $2500 Teaching Awards on Federalism

Jan 16, 2018 / E-news

Does federalism still matter? The Center for the Study of Federalism says yes! CSF will be awarding three teachers with $2500 each for unit plans focusing on federalism in the United States.
Middle and high school teachers can participate by creating unit plans that address the question, “Does federalism still matter?” Defined as the distribution of power in an organization between a central authority and the constituent, federalism in the U.S. is a complicated concept about balancing power between national and state governments. Unit plans should contain five to seven lesson plans that are adaptable for other teachers across the country and winning unit plans will be published on the CSF website. Within the theme of federalism, applicants may be creative and explore the subject area from a number of perspectives. For instance, a specific policy area, policy debates, or the policy-making process may be interesting angles from which students can grapple with issues relating to federalism.
For more information about the unit plan format and evaluation criteria, check out the Center for the Study of Federalism’s website.

Does federalism still matter? The Center for the Study of Federalism says yes! CSF will be awarding three teachers with $2500 each for unit plans focusing on federalism in the United States.

Middle and high school teachers can participate by creating unit plans that address the question, “Does federalism still matter?” Defined as the distribution of power in an organization between a central authority and the constituent, federalism in the U.S. is a complicated concept about balancing power between national and state governments.

Unit plans should contain five to seven lesson plans that are adaptable for other teachers across the country and winning unit plans will be published on the CSF website. Within the theme of federalism, applicants may be creative and explore the subject area from a number of perspectives. For instance, a specific policy area, policy debates, or the policy-making process may be interesting angles from which students can grapple with issues relating to federalism.

For more information about the unit plan format and evaluation criteria, check out the Center for the Study of Federalism’s website.

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