Got a Question About the Constitution? Ask John!

Jan 12, 2018 / E-news

The Ask John Project, a vital tool for students preparing for the We the People state finals, is available on the Center for Civic Education’s website!
The project consists of videos in which Professor John P. Kaminski of the Center for the Study of the American Constitution answers student questions about the 2017-18 We the People state hearing questions. He addressed questions submitted by We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution students from all over the nation as they participated in the program and prepared for their 2017–18 We the People state competitions. Questions range from “Why did it take three years to draft the Articles of Confederation?” to “Is common law synonymous to having an unwritten constitution?”
Kaminski teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is the founder/director of the Center for the Study of the American Constitution. His expertise in period and constitutional history is displayed in dozens of articles and books he has written on civics, American government and history, and the Founders, as well as his editing work on The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution.
The Ask John Project can also be found on YouTube and Facebook.

The Ask John Project, a vital tool for students preparing for the We the People state finals, is available on the Center for Civic Education’s website!

The project consists of videos in which Professor John P. Kaminski of the Center for the Study of the American Constitution answers student questions about the 2017-18 We the People state hearing questions. He addressed questions submitted by We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution students from all over the nation as they participated in the program and prepared for their 2017–18 We the People state competitions. Questions range from “Why did it take three years to draft the Articles of Confederation?” to “Is common law synonymous to having an unwritten constitution?”

Kaminski teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is the founder and director of the Center for the Study of the American Constitution. His expertise in period and constitutional history is displayed in dozens of articles and books he has written on civics, American government and history, and the Founders, as well as his editing work on The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution.

The Ask John Project can also be found on YouTube and Facebook.

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